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SCIENCE Scientists have identified 15 new genes that control the shape of our face

Published 20 Feb 2018 11:23AM

Words by AC Speed | Senior Editor

Researchers from KU Leuven (Belgium) and the universities of Pittsburgh, Stanford, and Penn State (US) have identified fifteen genes that determine our facial features. The findings were published in Nature Genetics on 19 February (Genome-wide mapping of global-to-local genetic effects on human facial shape)

"We're basically looking for needles in a haystack," says Seth Weinberg (Pittsburgh). "In the past, scientists selected specific features, including the distance between the eyes or the width of the mouth. They would then look for a connection between this feature and many genes. This has already led to the identification of a number of genes but, of course, the results are limited because only a small set of features are selected and tested."

New research developed by KU Leuven in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, Stanford and Penn State, the team adopted a new approach in order to identify new genes that help shape the face.

"Our search doesn't focus on specific traits, My colleagues from Pittsburgh and Penn State each provided a database with 3D images of faces and the corresponding DNA of these people. Each face was automatically subdivided into smaller modules.

Next, we examined whether any locations in the DNA matched these modules. This modular division technique made it possible for the first time to check for an unprecedented number of facial features." lead author Peter Claes (KU Leuven) explains.

The scientists were able to identify fifteen locations in our DNA. The Stanford team found out that genomic loci linked to these modular facial features are active when our face develops in the womb. "Furthermore, we also discovered that different genetic variants identified in the study are associated with regions of the genome that influence when, where and how much genes are expressed," says Joanna Wysocka (Stanford).

Seven of the fifteen identified genes are linked to the nose, and that's good news, Peter Claes (KU Leuven) continues. "A skull doesn't contain any traces of the nose, which only consists of soft tissue and cartilage. Therefore, when forensic scientists want to reconstruct a face on the basis of a skull, the nose is the main obstacle. If the skull also yields DNA, it would become much easier in the future to determine the shape of the nose."

Mark Shriver said, "We won't be able to predict a correct and complete face on the basis of DNA tomorrow. We're not even close to knowing all the genes that give shape to our face. Furthermore, our age, environment, and lifestyle have an impact on what our face looks like as well."

Peter Claes, who specialises in computational image analysis, points out that there are other potential applications as well: "With the same novel technology used in this study, we can also link other medical images -- such as brain scans -- to genes. In the long term, this could provide genetic insight into the shape and functioning of our brain, as well as in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's."

This could also be used by historians, forensic scientists and facial reconstructive research.



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